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Carlos Bocanegra takes to Facebook, gives defense of Klinsmann

Mar 20, 2013, 12:35 PM EDT

bocanegra Getty Images

If Carlos Bocanegra really was broken hearted, he got over it.

That was the distraught picture painted by an anonymous player in yesterday’s buzzworthy piece, but judging by what the U.S. men’s national team captain posted to Facebook last night, he was either never as crestfallen as described or is showing an admirable amount of resiliency.

Posting to his Facebook page last night, Bocanegra provided a tacit defense of Jurgen Klinsmann, lauding one aspect of his coach’s communication style while providing some perspective on a coach’s prerogative:

During the last 18 months Jurgen has introduced a lot of new ideas to the team and has a vision of how he wants to grow the program. Every coach around the world has his own style and methods. He has always been up front with players about where they stand and where he sees them going. Not every player is going to be happy with all of the decisions and methods, but he will tell you to your face where you stand. From a coach, that is the best thing you could ask for. One of the greatest strengths of this team has always been our unity and spirit, and we all remain committed to the cause of qualifying for the World Cup.

Let’s go ahead and read way too much into this.

One possibility holds Bocanegra has put aside his broken heart (another person’s diagnosis) and taken the high road, electing to issue a pacifying statement with the hopes that it can defuse the potentially distracting controversy. Even from Spain, the captain’s providing leadership. He may not be happy with situation, and he could very well share all the concerns that came out this week. But as far as his public face is concerned? He’s the captain.

Another other possibility: Bocanegra is being earnest and just stating the obvious. After Tuesday’s early backlash, he felt it was important to provide a more level-headed perspective. Yes, there are unhappy players, but “[n]ot every player is going to be happy.” Klinsmann’s “vision” is “new”, but “[e]very coach around the world has his own style and methods.”

Much like the Sporting News piece, Bocanegra’s embodies both sides of the debate. Klinsmann has changed things, but players know that, and they know why. According to Bocanegra, “that is the best thing you could ask for.” At some point, players need to adjust.

 

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