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John Terry willing to end international retirement, Hodgson should pass

Apr 27, 2013, 11:28 AM EST

John Terry's issues off the field saw him stripped of the England captaincy. Reuters

Chelsea’s John Terry is willing to end his hasty international retirement, an offer that should have England manager Roy Hodgson browsing for “Thanks, but no thanks” cards. Though England have proved thin at center half since Terry quit the Three Lions in September, there’s little good that can come from reintegrating the former captain into the current squad.

According to Dominic Fifield at the Guardian, Terry has his sights set on Brazil 2014, a change of heart partially motivated by impending changes at the top of The FA. David Bernstein, the current chairman of England’s federation, is set to step own later this year, and as we learned last week, Terry still resents Bernstein’s part in last year’s suspension for racial abuse.

When he retired from international duty, Terry called his position within the England national team “untenable.” Rather than represent a federation that was willing to ban him four games after he’d been cleared in a court of law, the Chelsea captain chose to walk away. At the time, it looked like a principled stand. Rather than persist in squad in which he was arguably still a starter, Terry was willing to call it an early day on a 78-cap career.

Now, with Terry’s potential comeback coinciding with Bernstein’s upcoming departure, his September retirement seems like a unsuccessful power play. That, or retirement seems more political than we may have originally thought. If I’m going to be suspended, I’ll just retire. Oh, nobody’s rallying to the cause? Um …

While there will always be a faction of onlookers who ascribe cynical motives to Terry, there was previously reason to believe his decision stemmed from a desire to eliminate a negative from his life. And there’s still reason to believe those were his thoughts, at the time. But now, with this willingness to make a quick about face that coincides with his snub of Bernstein? It casts that hasty retirement in another light.

You hate to say that if Terry’s simply had a change of heart. It’s entirely possible that he retired, regrets his decision, and now wants to rejoin his national team, a realization you wouldn’t begrudge anybody. Yet that indecisiveness only adds to the baggage Terry carries back into the national team, a history Hodgson need not engage when Gary Cahill, Michael Dawson, Phil Jagielka, Joleon Lescott, and Chris Smalling (and perhaps even Rio Ferdinand) are all viable options.

Although Terry’s post-prime decline has been exaggerated, he is no longer an improvement over that array of decent if unspectacular options, meaning there’s little incentive to bring him back into the team. The volatility that accompanies him is unlikely to be matched by an increased chance of success in Brazil. Though you never want to close a door when, should his center backs against become depleted, Hodgson could use Terry, the England boss may want to steer clear of Terry.

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