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Roberto Martínez hints at $45 million transfer purse, plan to upgrade training ground

Mar 27, 2014, 9:19 PM EDT

Roberto Martínez has exceeded early expectations at Everton, his "transition period" seeing the Toffees drop just one of their first 15 league games. (Source: Getty Images.) Getty Images

One of the major concerns surrounding Everton’s success has been the Toffees’ dependence on loaned talent; specifically, striker Romelu Lukaku and midfielder Gareth Barry. Yet if Roberto Martínez has even part of the transfer budget he hints at in reporting by The Guardian, finances may not be an issue in retaining those players. If Chelsea is unwilling to sell Lukaku to Everton, a potential $45 million budget means the Toffees will still be able to address their problems.

Speaking about his plans for this summer, Martínez revealed most of the money from the sales of Victor Anichebe, Marouane Fellaini, and Nikica Jelavic is still unspent, with the Everton boss avoiding the January transfer window with the goal of addressing his needs this summer. Those needs include improving the team’s Finch Farm training complex, where Martínez would like to add overnight facilities and a new field.

As relayed by The Guardian, Martínez already has precise plans for his transfer budget and the television money his team’s set to receive, with the first-year boss waiting for the result of his team’s Champions League pursuit before setting his heart on specific targets:

“We’ve got money to spend this summer,” the Everton manager said. “Remember we sold £40m worth of players and we only spent £13m [initially]. That money is there to be spent. The new TV money won’t make a massive difference on the playing side because we’ve got a lot of things we want to do on the training ground. We want to build accommodation here, have bedrooms on site, put a new pitch in and give the training ground a big lift. I’m going to use the money for that.”

While the amount he has to spend will grab most’s attention, his views on the need for an improved training ground were the most fascinating part of his comments. Alluding to the now famous 10,000-hour rule, Martínez outlines the importance of keeping players onsite, explaining that getting players enough training time is “impossible” if they can’t sleep at the facility:

“The 10,000 hours rule [the supposed time required to become expert in any field] is impossible but if you can get a player doing double of what they do the benefits are incredible. Even before games you have to go to a hotel. You don’t create that environment of feeling at home. It is now a must to have bedrooms. Every first-team player should have a bedroom.”

It all makes perfect sense, but you just don’t hear managers at similar clubs speaking like this. Martínez has a clear and (as The Guardian described) meticulous vision of what he wants to do three months from now. He knows how much he wants to invest in the squad, how much should be devoted to the future, and (apparently) how a potential qualification for Champions League will affect both. He knows exact who he wants to bring in, how to prioritize their captures, and how much money he can spend on them. And, by collecting that money over the last nine months (and not blowing any of it in January), he’s illustrating how his current views are the product of careful planning that probably started the day he accepted the job.

That he’s had success on the field help him focus on the future, but you can’t separate that from the overall package. That Martínez is challenging for Champions League is probably a function of the same mindset that’s prioritizing the training ground. It’s all part of a vision of the game that sees style, results, development, and sustainability as related – a complete philosophy that’s led to his name to be connected with a potential opening at Barcelona.

That’s most likely tabloid nonsense. In reality, the doubts that Martínez accumulated through multiple relegation scraps at Wigan have completely dissipated. The FA Cup he won with the Latics looks like the first accomplishment in a long, prolific career instead of some consolidation prize Wigan earned on its way to the second division. Particularly after Owen Coyle struggled (and was eventually let go) in Martínez’s wake, the manager’s value became more obvious. There are reasons why Dave Whelan was remiss to see him go.

Everton fans will hope they don’t have to say goodbye so soon. Though the Blues may not finish much better than they did in their last season under David Moyes, the club has taken huge steps forward. Both in their style on the field and their plans foff, Everton is making meaningful strides forward, closing the gap many thought would be impossible to diminish while the club occupies Goodison Park.

  1. navyeoddavee9 - Mar 27, 2014 at 11:34 PM

    In RM we trust

  2. scrummymustard - Mar 28, 2014 at 10:48 AM

    I would have been happier hiring RM @ Man U instead of Moyes.

    • Mr. No Days Off - Mar 28, 2014 at 4:17 PM

      Hindsight is always 20/20. There were articles written like this about David Moyes last year and now people want to trash him like he forgot how to coach overnight. Some managers are better off managing smaller clubs.

  3. jrbowserlfc - Mar 29, 2014 at 12:17 AM

    There’s always going to be a risk associated with hiring a younger manager who hasn’t managed a club of a higher stature before. As a Liverpool fan, I was concerned Rodgers was up to the job at a big club, but he is obviously up to the task. Martinez’s Wigan teams played attractive football but they were always mired in relegation battles. I had my doubts that Martinez would be able to implement that style with Everton, because under Moyes’ decade-long leadership, they played some of the most hideous Stoke-style form of hoof ball/rugby. We were lead to believe that style was all they could play because of their finances, but Martinez dispelled that theory while Moyes implemented his hoof ball/cross incessantly style at United. Everton are fortunate to have Martinez. Except for the glory hunters, the footballing world is fortunate to have Moyes at United.

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