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Wayne Rooney, Al Pacino and the World Cup

May 18, 2014, 7:43 AM EDT

England's Wayne Rooney celebrates after scoring during their 2014 World Cup qualifying soccer match against Poland at Wembley Stadium in London Reuters

It’s not often that you hear English soccer coaches advising their players to draw their inspiration from American film stars. But Roy Hodgson knows he needs to get through to Wayne Rooney in any way possible. Since bursting on to the scene in Euro 2004, at just 18, Rooney has struggled to make much of an impression in international tournaments.

So, too, have England. They made it to the quarter-finals of both Euro 2004 and the 2006 World Cup, but then failed to qualify for Euro 2008 and had a disappointing campaign in South Africa in 2010, when they went out in the first knockout round. And England being England, they were knocked out of Euro 2012 in the quarter-finals in the most English of ways, losing to Italy on penalties.

But Rooney was suspended for the start of that last major tournament. On his return, he scored the only goal, giving his team the 1-0 win over Ukraine. He was also one of only two English players to score their penalties against Gigi Buffon.

Yet at times Rooney has shown himself a tad undisciplined. He got himself suspended for the first two Euro group stage matches after he kicked out at Miodrag Džudović in England’s draw with Montenegro. He was sent off for a stomp on Ricardo Carvalho in 2006, with England going on to lose to Portugal on penalties. So is giving him advice connecting him to Michael Corleone of the Godfather movies really the best idea?

Hodgson went for it, anyway. Talking about Rooney’s need to rise to the occasion in Brazil, the England coach said:

I’m sure it must be the same for Hollywood film stars,” he added. “I’m sure you make your first film and nobody knows much about you and you get some good reviews. But one day you’re going to be Al Pacino, you’re going to be Jack Nicholson. And, suddenly, you’ve got to make a f—— good film.

Not sure if Pacino is quite the right analogy, however. It only took Al a couple of years after making his first film for Francis Ford Coppala to take notice and cast him in The Godfather. He then collected Oscar nominations, along with stellar reviews. Whereas Rooney’s been subject to much criticism after his initial foray onto the world stage, when he scored four goals at Euro 2004.

But Pacino did hit a bit of a rough patch in the early 1980s, taking on some controversial roles. Then came Scarface, just over ten years after The Godfather. The movie was huge at the box office, met with critical acclaim and even earned Pacino a Golden Globe.

So perhaps what Hodgson is saying to Rooney is: it’s time to make your Scarface, son.

Although, one presumes, without the mountain of cocaine and the assault rifle.

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