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German soccer to institute matchday anti-doping blood tests

May 23, 2014, 3:19 PM EDT

Koch Getty Images

In a fight to eliminate steroid use from its game, the DFB has announced it will take unprecedented measures of randomly blood testing athletes on matchdays.

They also announced they will increase their anti-doping budget by $136,000 from last year.

The DFB last August announced they had agreed to institute blood tests during training, but came under fire from FIFA’s chief doctor Jiri Dvorak for limiting the testing to only during training.

Last season the NADA conducted a total of 2,300 anti-doping tests in Germany across the top two divisions, and DFB vice-president Rainer Koch (pictured) told German radio station HR that he plans to nearly double that this coming season.

15% of those 2,300 tests were blood tests, according to Koch, while the rest were urine tests. Koch says they will do about 120 postmatch blood tests throughout next season, which he described as “supplimentary” to urine tests.

However, there is some backlash, namely from German anti-doping website fussballdoping.de, which states that the current deal with the NADA, which was signed last August, runs through 2014, so the new measures cannot be implemented until 2015 unless they modify the old deal.

Blood testing for steroids has received harsh opposition in American sports, cited mostly as a privacy issue by those against it, but it has become slowly more accepted throughout the years.  With advancing drugs and masking agents often ahead of the current tests, blood testing has been tabbed as an eventual necessity by many in the field.