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Prices for Belgium-United States eclipse $1,000 per ticket on the secondary market

Jun 26, 2014, 9:39 PM EST

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - JUNE 15: A fan holds a 'We Need Tickets' sign prior to the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil Group F match between Argentina and Bosnia-Herzegovina at Maracana on June 15, 2014 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Getty Images

Our friends at Soccerly hit this earlier today, but since the United States’ World Cup knockout round opponents became known (after Belgium beat South Korea), the price of the tickets to the teams’ Round of 16 game have jumped. Whereas the secondary market originally had tickets going for an average of $850.98 earlier today, the price on Tiqiq.com is up to $1031, though tickets can had for as little as $400 each.

Those numbers include prices from all vendors in Tiqiq’s market, with seats covering a range of options at Salvador’s Fonte Nova Arena. For $400, you can sit in the corner of one of the arena’s upper levels, with tickets close to the field stretching as high as $1614.

In isolation, it’s difficult to see the scope of those numbers, but compared to the markets for the rest of the tournament’s second round matches, tickets for Belgium’s meeting with the U.S. are proving a low-to-mid-range value.

Here are all the Round of 16 average ticket prices, according to Tiqiq.com:

  • $2146 – Argentina vs. Switzerland (São Paulo)
  • $1731 – Colombia vs. Uruguay (Rio de Janeiro)
  • $1554 – Brazil vs. Chile (Belo Horizonte)
  • $1296 – Germany vs. Algeria (Porto Alegre)
  • $1121 – Netherlands vs. Mexico (Fortaleza)
  • $1031 – Belgium vs. United States (Salvador)
  • $797 – France vs. Nigeria (Brasilía)
  • $713 – Costa Rica vs. Greece (Recife)

(Mean: $1298.63; Median: $1208.50)

As much as the teams may be driving these prices, look at the cities at the top of the list. São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, two of the largest cities in the world, are created a huge demand. Cities farther north (Salvador, Recife, Fortaleza) don’t have the same population bases, while the capital of Brasilía may be suffering from the same problem.

But we’ve heard about the huge presence the U.S. fans have had in Brazil. Same with Mexico. Those fan bases may be driving demand for games that might otherwise sit closer to France-Nigeria.

Tickets for the games in the two big cities? Of course, those are going to be expensive. If Brazil happened to be playing in one of those venues, who knows how high those prices would go.

Elsewhere, other factors need to generate the demand. When none of those factors exist? Costa Rica-Greece.

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