Skip to content

As loss to Belgium exemplified, time is now for US to develop game-changing players, style

Jul 2, 2014, 9:47 AM EST

Julian Green Getty Images

Every now and again, it is fun to think about: What if just ONE of America’s greatest athletes had played soccer instead? What if LeBron or Cam Newton or Mike Trout or Adrian Peterson or Patrick Kane had chosen soccer instead of their sport?

Tuesday, I think, we saw what it might have looked like: It might have looked just a little bit like Belgium’s Romelu Lukaku.

Did you see him? Holy cow: Did you SEE him? Apparently Lukaku has been disappointing for much of this World Cup, listless, indifferent, unready for such a big stage. That, I guess, is why he was a substitute on Tuesday. Lukaku is only 21 years old, and he has spent much of his young career in the Premier League getting loaned out. He’s clearly trying to find his place.

But talent? Absurd. He’s 6-foot-3. He’s brilliantly fast – have you seen that Quicksilver scene in the new X-Men movie? Yeah, he’s like that fast. Most of all, he’s just overpowering when he runs. Like Peterson. Like LeBron. The Guardian named Lukaku one of the 10 most promising players in Europe.

And Tuesday, in extra time, he came in and he made the World Cup his own by running through a game but tired United States defense again and again – unstoppable, unbreakable, untouchable. It was mind-boggling. The United States would send one, two, three defenders at him and he would just smash through them. He set up Belgium’s first goal by simply running through a stumbling U.S. defender. He scored the second with a powerful run to the near post where he shielded off the defender and left-footed a smash past goalkeeper Tim Howard. He had various other moments that almost ended up as goals.

[MORE: Belgium sinks U.S. in extra time, advances to World Cup quarterfinals]

The United States has had many good soccer players. They’ve had scrappy defenders and tough midfielders and blazing fast forwards. Their goaltender, Howard, put on a display for the ages against Belgium with 16 saves, the most ever recorded for a World Cup game. He’s one of the best goalkeepers in the world; America has had a few good goalkeepers. Well, we’re good with our hands.

[MORE: Howard’s heroics not enough in ‘heartbreaking’ U.S. World Cup exit]

But they’ve never had a Romelu Lukaku. Or, more to the point, America’s Romelu Lukakus have spent the last few decades driving hard to the basket, plowing through linebackers and crashing into fences after long fly balls. What kind of goal scorer could Barry Sanders have been? How about Dave Winfield? What about Tim Tebow?

So far America has never had that soccer force who can scare the heck out of the rest of the world. So far America has not had a player who can take over games the way Lukaku did. And it seems that until American soccer has a Lukaku (never mind a real soccer genius like Messi or Neymar), a player capable of making magic time after time, this round of 16 business just might be their limit.

Oh, make no mistake, this was a very nice World Cup for the United States. Few thought they could escape the so-called Group of Death, with Germany and Portugal both ranked in the FIFA Top 5 and the added bonus of Ghana, the country that ended America’s last  two World Cups.

It wasn’t easy. The U.S. scored almost instantly against Ghana this time, then withstood a furious barrage, and finally scored a late game-winner. The U.S. outplayed Portugal and should have come away with a victory but took the draw after a singular bit of magnificence from Cristiano Ronaldo. Then, even in a loss to Germany, they showed will and gritty defending against a clearly superior team.

What they rarely showed, though, was brilliance. Throughout the tournament, the key word was “possession” – the U.S. gave the ball away again and again … they could rarely build any sort of sustained attack because they couldn’t keep possession long enough. A team can have some success at the World Cup with a well-organized defense and a couple of lightning-bolt goals. But sooner or later, that style runs its course.

[MORE: USA player ratings vs. Belgium  |  Signs of progress small, but clear]

Yes, the United States could have beaten Belgium on Tuesday – if Chris Wondolowski had punched home that remarkable chance in the final minute of regulation, the United States surely would have won. But talking about missed chances in soccer isn’t especially helpful; if Howard had not been Superman, the United States would have lost 6-0. The bigger point was the U.S. was thoroughly outplayed by a much more talented team. The U.S. might have stolen the game, but it would have been just that: A steal. Belgium was much, much better.

And if the U.S. is to take the next step, they cannot go into games where they are thoroughly outclassed. The U.S. needs to develop some players who go beyond tough, beyond rugged, beyond resilient and fit and hard-working. They need to develop some players who can do wizardry.

This is something people have been talking about for decades – the “when will America develop a world-class player” stories were written 30 or 40 years ago – but I suspect the time is now.

Sure, people will keep arguing about soccer’s place in the American landscape. Some will point to the extraordinary way this World Cup took hold in the United States. Others will point to the extremely low ratings of MLS. Some will see the trend of young people embracing soccer. Others will point to the many years of youth soccer dominance in America and how little impact it has had on soccer as a spectator sport. That argument isn’t stopping anytime soon.

But wherever soccer ends up on the great American sports spectrum, there is no question that this is a moment for the team to build on. Two young players – DeAndre Yedlin and Julian Green – had auspicious debuts this World Cup. But there’s something else, too.

You know the story of Pelé, right? He was 10 years old in 1950, when his home country of Brazil lost to Uruguay in one of the most famous matches ever played. The young Pelé saw his father crying after the loss. Pelé went up to his father and said, “Don’t worry. One day, I will win it.”

Something like that could very well have happened at this World Cup, too. This was the most-watched World Cup in American history and by far the most talked about. So maybe a 10-year-old who plays all the sports – maybe a whole bunch of 10 year olds – saw the brilliant passing of Ronaldo, the magic of Messi, the sheer physical sway of Belgium’s 19-year-old wunderkind Divock Origi and his replacement, Lukaku. And maybe they thought, “That’s what I want to be.”

The U.S. fell in the round of 16 for the second straight World Cup. They played hard, and they held up well, and they gave us a final 15 minutes to remember, and they were not good enough. But if those kids were watching … this could be the most important result in U.S. World Cup history.

Latest Posts
  1. DONE DEAL: Arsenal, West Brom and Villarreal all got new players Wednesday

    Jan 28, 2015, 11:10 PM EST

    arsenal.com arsenal.com

    So what went down on Wednesday, as the transfer window took another step toward slamming shut?

  2. VIDEO: Christian Eriksen scores a free kick for the ages in League Cup semi

    Jan 28, 2015, 10:20 PM EST

    Sheffield United v Tottenham Hotspur - Capital One Cup Semi-Final: Second Leg Getty Images

    Set up for a free kick outside the 18, Eriksen not only sent an arrow whizzing over the goal, but he managed to spin it into the far upper 90.

  3. Real Madrid will change the name of the Santiago Bernabeu

    Jan 28, 2015, 9:58 PM EST

    Bernabeu Getty Images

    The La Liga giant has woked out a sponsorship deal with United Arab Emirates-based International Petroleum Investment Company (IPIC).

  4. USMNT postgame reaction: Jozy unsure of 3-5-2, Klinsmann explains changes

    Jan 28, 2015, 9:17 PM EST

    Klinsmann AP

    Jurgen Klinsmann remained upbeat, while Jozy Altidore was obviously disappointed.

  5. Player Ratings: Some good, some not so good in Chile’s 3-2 win over the U.S.

    Jan 28, 2015, 8:42 PM EST

    Chile US Soccer AP

    Breaking down the good, the bad and the ugly from Wednesday’s 3-2 loss in Chile.

  6. 3-5-2 system shows life, but plenty of work is needed

    Jan 28, 2015, 8:15 PM EST

    Yedlin Getty Images

    Jurgen Klinsmann said he played the 3-CB system because he had DeAndre Yedlin available. So did it work?

  7. Chile 3-2 USMNT: Another lead disintegrates for Klinsmann’s crew

    Jan 28, 2015, 8:00 PM EST

    Chile US Soccer AP

    Another match fell apart in a haze of substitutions and mistakes as the United States blew a 2-1 lead in Rancagua on Wednesday night.

  8. WATCH: Yedlin to Diskerud to Altidore, and U.S. goes up 2-1 over Chile

    Jan 28, 2015, 7:03 PM EST

    Honduras v United States Getty Images

    Maybe Sunderland just doesn’t know how to use its forwards.

  9. At the half: Altidore, Shea have USMNT leading Chile 2-1 (video)

    Jan 28, 2015, 6:54 PM EST

    @USSoccer @USSoccer

    It was sloppy at times, with the States very much getting used to the 3-5-2 and both sides using a bevy of second-choice players.

  10. WATCH: Brek Shea opens the scoring for the USMNT in Chile

    Jan 28, 2015, 6:48 PM EST

    Ukraine v USA - International Friendly Getty Images

    Brek Shea’s first USMNT goal in a year and a half was a pretty nice finish.

  11. WATCH: Who throws a shoe (at a ref)? Arda Turan in Atleti’s loss to Barca

    Jan 28, 2015, 5:45 PM EST

    2fc2d5e8ed7f8aa879db8540f8f644b0 Getty Images

    Arda Turan was fouled, losing his shoe in the process. Since the linesman didn’t deem the offense worthy of a foul, Turan had one recourse.

  12. Klinsmann goes 3-5-2 versus Chile; Shea and Yedlin on the wings

    Jan 28, 2015, 5:00 PM EST

    @USSoccer @USSoccer

    Real Salt Lake’s Nick Rimando is between the sticks for the States, and Jermaine Jones continues his time as a center back.

  13. Sheffield United 2-2 Tottenham: Eriksen sees Spurs to All-London final in absolute thriller

    Jan 28, 2015, 4:52 PM EST

    Sheffield United v Tottenham Hotspur - Capital One Cup Semi-Final: Second Leg Getty Images

    After a thriller at Bramall Lane, Chelsea and Spurs will duke it out on March 1 in their shared home city for the League Cup.

  14. Africa Cup of Nations roundup: Lots will be drawn to determine second place in Group D

    Jan 28, 2015, 3:57 PM EST

    FBL-AFR-2015-MATCH23-CMR-CIV Getty Images

    The lots will be drawn at 10am ET on Thursday. Winner gets Ghana on Feb. 1.

  15. U.S. international Sacha Kljestan signs for New York Red Bulls

    Jan 28, 2015, 3:01 PM EST

    Galatasaray AS v RSC Anderlecht - UEFA Champions League Getty Images

    Huge trade now makes sense as Kljestan arrives in MLS.

  16. Transfer rumor roundup: Cuadrado can join Chelsea for $40 million say Fiorentina

    Jan 28, 2015, 2:39 PM EST

    ACF Fiorentina v SSC Napoli - Serie A Getty Images

    With less than a week left in the window, here’s the latest gossip…

  17. Queens Park Rangers’ Canadian winger Junior Hoilett on Toronto FC, relegation battles and more

    Jan 28, 2015, 2:00 PM EST

    Queens Park Rangers v Crystal Palace - Premier League Getty Images

    Toronto native Hoilett chats to PST about MLS, being involved in a Premier League relegation battle and much more in this one-on-one.

  18. Arsenal make it official, sign Brazilian defender Gabriel Paulista from Villarreal

    Jan 28, 2015, 1:10 PM EST

    FBL-EUR-C3-APOLLON-VILLARREAL FBL-EUR-C3-APOLLON-VILLARREAL

    Wenger get’s his man as Arsenal’s new center back has finally arrived.

  19. English FA charge Chelsea’s Diego Costa with violent conduct after stamp, may miss Man City match

    Jan 28, 2015, 12:28 PM EST

    FBL-ENG-LCUP-CHELSEA-LIVERPOOL FBL-ENG-LCUP-CHELSEA-LIVERPOOL

    Costa could miss Chelsea’s massive clash against Man City on Saturday. All the details, here.

  20. Chelsea sweating on fitness of Cesc Fabregas, plus others, ahead of Manchester City match

    Jan 28, 2015, 11:47 AM EST

    Chelsea v Arsenal - Premier League Getty Images

    Chelsea’s injury problems are piling up ahead of their huge tilt against City this Saturday.

Featured video

Top five Premier League goals: Week 22