Skip to content

Luis Suarez’s lawyer optimistic the biting ban will be reduced

Aug 7, 2014, 8:59 AM EST

Brazil Soccer WCup Italy Uruguay AP

Luis Suarez’s biting problems aren’t anything new, but they were thrust onto the national stage at the World Cup in June, when Barcelona’s recent acquisition and Uruguay international was caught biting Italy defender Giorgio Chiellini on the shoulder.

The FIFA Disciplinary Committee then followed up the incident by inflicting upon Suarez a four-month ban from all football related activity, including not being able to enter a stadium and an inability to play in nine international matches

But Suarez’s lawyer, Daniel Cravo, is sure that his client’s lengthy sentence will be decreased, although his attempt to accomplish this task with the Court of Arbitration of Sport (world football’s governing body) failed last month.

This Friday, Cravo will try once more to put Suarez’s biting and on-field issues into perspective. While he hopes to get the former Liverpool standout back onto the field as soon as possible, Cravo believes that FIFA doesn’t have a great deal of backing for this long ban, if one was to observe incidents that took place at the World Cup in years past.

“I think FIFA wanted to show they could take action,” he said, per Radio Globo. “There was dissatisfaction with how other incidents had been treated at the World Cup and Suarez paid for them. Not even the sanction of [Zinedine] Zidane in 2006 or those of Leonardo and [Mauro] Tassotti in 1994 were as severe.

“Is the Suarez incident the worst in the history of the World Cup?

“I believe that the sanction which affects his work at a club level will be revoked. There is no precedent in history to justify it.

“I am going to try and reduce his ban with Uruguay — nine games is too much and would stop him from playing until 2016.

“[The CAS] is totally different and on various occasions in the past they have taken completely different decisions to those which have been taken by FIFA.”

The court may draw upon the Suarez’s two other biting occurrences, both taking place in club competition. In 2010 playing for Ajax, Suarez bit PSV Eindhoven’s Otman Bakkal on the shoulder, and in 2013, Suarez was given a 10-game suspension for biting Chelsea man Branislov Ivanovic.

  1. jolink653 - Aug 7, 2014 at 10:35 AM

    This is absolutely ridiculous. This is the THIRD time that this idiot has deliberately tried to hurt someone, not to mention the Evra incident. You can’t compare him to Leonardo or Zidane because those were all one-time offenses. A player is supposed to learn from his punishment, but clearly Suarez either hasn’t or doesn’t care. You cannot let him on the pitch until he gets mental help and clears this up. What happens if next time he bites someone he causes serious damage to another player?

    They better uphold this ban. And I don’t want to hear moaning from Barca. They knew what they were bringing in when they bought him

    • scoochpooch - Aug 7, 2014 at 11:11 AM

      I couldn’t agree more but let me pose one question to everyone, why haven’t any of his opponents ever taken things into their own hands? Why doesn’t a player on the verge of retirement attack him physically? This can be done during the course of play – spikes to the face or break his leg with a nasty tackle. Or after one of his dives, the player could kick him violently in the head or teeth. This would solve his biting issues once and for all. A hockey player would never stand for Suarez’s actions.

    • scoochpooch - Aug 7, 2014 at 11:13 AM

      I couldn’t agree more but let me pose one question to everyone, why haven’t any of his opponents ever taken things into their own hands? Why doesn’t a player on the verge of retirement attack him physically? This can be done during the course of play – spikes to the face or break his leg with a nasty tackle. Or after one of his dives, the player could kick him violently in the head or teeth. This would solve his biting issues once and for all. A hockey player would never stand for Suarez’s actions. Solution.

    • kriswie2014 - Aug 10, 2014 at 4:33 AM

      I have been following all those opinions in reference to Luis Suares and his “crime” and I what puzzles me about these very strong judgements is that they never consider some very fundamental questions and subsequent answers. Those being:
      1. Did he really hurt anyone? The answer is no, he did not. In each instance, player “bitten” by Suares was able to continue, but also none of them suffered an injury preventing him to train, play a next game or go home and have sex with his gf/wife. How does he action compare to a vicious elbow to a face or ribcage? Is it equal or greater than breaking someone’s leg? The obvious answer is no.
      2. Did his action change a course of a game giving an advantage to his side. Again, the answer is no. This answer applies to the infraction being spotted immediately or after the game. Thus, how does it compare, let’s say, with scoring using one’s hand with premeditation?

      Finally, after the answers to the above are given, the logical question would have to be – does the punishment fit the crime in reference to other “crimes” taking place in an average game? It does not.

      It all a result of hype and shewed commentaries (unfortunately most of them from English press) and sensatiolism that sheep reading such things so easily accept as their own. What he did was wrong and deserved a yellow card but never what he got… relatively to (other actions/punishments) speaking.

Leave Comment

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Not a member? Register now!

Featured video

Man United thrash Liverpool